Ko Samui

Ko Samui

A trip to Ko Samui (sometimes known as Koh Samui) really does have something for everyone, with quite secluded beaches, traditional Thai fishing villages and lively nightlife all on the second largest island in Thailand.

With connections from the mainland by ferry and Samui airport, the island has options for everyone from budget travelers to luxury resorts

Peak season on Ko Samui is December to February when rainfall is low (around 30mm in February), up to 8 hours of sunshine per day with maximum temperatures around 30°C/86°F. The seas will be perfect for swimming and winds will be light.

The hot season is between March and august although average daily high temperatures are only a couple of degrees higher. It tends to remain relatively dry until May when late afternoon torrential thunderstorms become more common. Days tend to be hot and sunny until then.

The Monsoon starts in September until November or early December. Temperatures are still around 30°C/86°F and there can be a number of lovely sunny days. However very heavy rain, although often in short bursts, is very common.

Getting There

The paradise starts at Samui Airport, which is one of the most attractive airports you will see. The airport is owned by Bangkok Airways so they often the best connections and prices although other airlines do also land there. There are no direct flights from the UK and connections are usually through Bangkok, Singapore and Hong Kong are other common connections.

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Many people travelling around Thailand will choose to arrive by Ferry from the mainland. Prices are much lower than flying. You can also use the ferries to get to neighbouring islands. There are four ferry terminals on Ko Samui; Nathon Pier (on the West coast) , Bangrak Pier (near Big Buddha beach at the North of the island and closest to Chaweng), Maenam Pier (North of the island) and Lipa Noi Pier (South West of the island). Ferries connect to the mainland for Bangkok, Hua Hin, Krabi and Phuket – please note that there is usually a road trip (sometimes quite long) after the ferry journey. Local islands are also well served including Koh Phangan and Koh Tao

Getting Around

Hotel ShuttlesMost hotels will have a mini-bus and/or cars that provide regular trips to the local centre or, more often, to Chaweng. They will also be able to arrange other trips for you.

Taxi – Not a cheap option on Samui but there are plenty of taxis around, make sure you agree a price before you start your journey as they will rarely use the meter.

Songthaew– There isn’t a bus service on the island. But the next best thing are the Songthaews who regularly drive up and down the main roads and will usually stop when hailed, even if they already look full, you will be amazed how many can fit in one. They generally travel set routes so make sure you make it clear where you want to go and ring the bell when you want to stop.

Motorcycle taxis are a good option for a short journey, again agree a price in advance and wear a helmet.

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Hire car or bikes – It is much safer to hire these here than in the cities but be careful, even though they drive on the correct side of the road traffic laws, right of way and regulations are different. Road conditions can change quickly during rain storms. Those open top cars or jeeps may look tempting but it is a quick way of getting sunburn, it’s harder to notice when you have the breeze when driving, and will be very uncomfortable if you do have a roof to put up and there is no air conditioning. Make sure you have the correct licence, insurance and wear seat belts or helmets at all times.

Where to Stay

Find out about the different areas of Ko Samui

14 Things To Do In Ko Samui

A diverse island with stunning views, temples, scenery, beaches, shopping and more. The beaches are wonderful but there is so much more to do here.

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